Ethiopia Duwancho Natural

Honeycomb, Strawberry, Nasturtium
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£12.50
Sale price
£12.50
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We aim to ship all domestic orders within a day, via Royal Mail.

Honeycomb. Strawberries. Nasturtiums. Need we say more? This might be the most delicious of all the Ethiopian naturals that we stocked up on this year. It's juicy, sugary, and complex out the whazoo... No wonder it's named for an Ethiopian fruit!

We sourced this coffee with our friends at Falcon Coffee.

This coffee is the micro-lot from the Keramo area. It has been called Duwancho because of its incredible fruity cup profile: Duwancho is a name of a fruit widespread in the same zone. The coffee is sourced from 279 farmers from the Keramo village area who are Daye Bensa cooperative members.

The lot is processed as a natural to further enhance the explosion of fruity flavours that the coffee naturally possesses. Daye Bensa microlots are produced on a limited scale, which ensures the maximum focus on the quality of the beans. As soon as the coffee is received, it gets sorted by floating and picking out the ripe cherries. It is then dried on african beds for 13-15 days; one person is responsible for one bed, and the cherries are rotated every 15 minutes to ensure uniformity of drying.
At Daye Bensa utmost attention is paid to the traceability of the microlots.

The record-keeping book is carefully handled, and lots are diligently separated so as to guarantee the highest quality. The lots are traced in the following way: when the cherries are received, they are separated by village, the coffee is then kept separate throughout drying, processing, and storage, with labels stating the delivery dates, farm name, lot number, and more details related to the particular lot.
Daye Bensa is a business with strong community orientation: it delivers additional bonus payment to the farmers based on the volume they contribute to the microlots; the consistency of the bean quality throughout years is also rewarded. Cooperation with the village schools is also thriving. when the cherries are received they got separate by village, the coffee is then kept separate throughout drying, processing, and storage, with labels stating the delivery dates, farm name, lot number, and more details related to the particular lot.

Daye Bensa is a particularly "Community" oriented business delivering additional bonus payment to the farmers based on the volume they contribute to the Micro-lots and they reward consistency year in year out. This year they are also rewarding their workers at the farm for the crucial role they have during the drying process. At last they are constantly working with the school principal in the villages surrounding the farm providing school materials for the students that struggle with their basic needs such as note pads or pens